>  Topics > TDG > Dangerous Goods

TDG

Correlations between TDG and GHS

By Little Pro on 2016-07-19 Views:  Update:2017-01-18

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHSand the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods Model Regulations (TDG)  are the most important guidance documents on chemical hazard communication in the world. Most of countries have adopted GHS and TDG  via their own national regulations. In this article, we will summarize the correlations between GHS and TDG, and compare GHS with TDG in terms of classification critiera and labelling requirement.

Comparison of TDG and GHS

Item UN TDG GHS
Scope Both chemicals and articles Mainly chemicals
Classes 9 dangerous goods classes 27 hazard classes
Hazard communication Labelling & marking, placarding, dangerous goods declaration Pictogram, GHS labels and safety data sheets
Name UN orange book  UN purple book

To fully understand the correlations between TDG and GHS, you need to know the definitions of hazardous chemicals, GHS classified chemicals and dangerous goods

  • Chemicals meeting GHS classification criteria are hazardous chemicals;
  • Chemicals and articles on dangerous goods list or meeting dangerous goods classification criteria are dangerous goods;
  • Not all dangerous goods are chemicals or GHS classified (i.e., batteries, airbags, etc);
  • Chemicals that belong to dangerous goods are usually GHS classified/hazardous chemicals.

Comparison of GHS Classification and Transport Classification

GHS Classification Dangerous Goods Classification
Unstable explosives Not allowed for transport
Explosives, Division 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 Class 1 explosive substances and articles, Division 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6
Flammable gases category 1//Pyrophoric gases category 1/ Class 2 Division 2.1: Flammable gases
Flammable gases category 2/Chemically unstable gases category A/B Not dangerous goods
Aerosols category 1 and 2 Class 2 Division 2.1: Flammable gases
Aerosols category 3 Class 2 Division 2.2: Non-flammable, non-toxic gases
Oxidizing gases category 1 Class 5 Division 5.1: Oxidizing substances
Gases under pressure Class 2 Division 2.2: Non-flammable, non-toxic gases
Flammable liquids, category 1, 2, 3 Class 3 Flammable liquids, packing group I, II, III
Flammable liquids, category 4 Not dangerous goods
Flammable solids category 1, 2 Class 4 Division 4.1: Flammable solids, packing group II, III
Self-reactive substances, Type A See explosives. May not be allowed for transport.
Self-reactive substances, Type B,C,D,E,F Class 4 Division 4.1: Flammable solids
Self-reactive substances, Type G Not dangerous goods
Pyrophoric solids category 1 Class 4 Division 4.2: Substances liable to spontaneous combustion
Pyrophoric liquids category 1 Class 4 Division 4.2: Substances liable to spontaneous combustion
Self-heating substances and mixtures, category 1, 2 Class 4 Division 4.2: Substances liable to spontaneous combustion, Packing group II, III
Substances which on contact with water emit flammable gases category 1, 2, 3 Class 4 Division 4.3: Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases, Packing group I, II, III
Oxidizing liquids category 1, 2, 3 Class 5 Division 5.1: Oxidizing substances, Packing group I, II, III
Oxidizing solids category 1, 2, 3 Class 5 Division 5.1: Oxidizing substances, Packing group I, II, III
Organic peroxides type A See explosives. May not be allowed for transport.
Organic peroxides type B, C, D, E, F Class 5 Division 5.2: Organic peroxides
Organic peroxides type G Not dangerous goods
Corrosive to metals category 1 Class 8 corrosive substances, Packing group III
Acute toxicity category 1, 2, 3 Class 6 Division 6.1: Toxic substances, Packing group I, II, III
Acute toxicity category 4,5 Not dangerous goods
Skin irritation/corrosion category 1 (1A/1B/1C) Class 8 corrosive substances, Packing group I, II, III
Skin irritation/corrosion category 2 & 3 Not dangerous goods
Serious eye damage/eye irritation category 1/2A/2B Not dangerous goods
Respiratory or skin sensitization category 1 Not dangerous goods
Germ cell mutagenicity category 1A/1B/2 Not dangerous goods
Carcinogenicity category 1A/1B/2 Not dangerous goods
Reproductive toxicity category 1A/1B/2 Not dangerous goods
Serious eye damage/eye irritation category 1/2A/2B Not dangerous goods
Target organ systemic toxicity - single exposure category 1, 2 and 3 Not dangerous goods
Target organ systemic toxicity - repeated exposure category 1 and 2 Not dangerous goods
Aspiration toxicity category 1 and 2 Not dangerous goods
Hazardous to aquatic environment (acute) category 1 Class 9 miscellaneous dangerous goods: marine pollutant or environmentally hazardous substances, packing group III
Hazardous to aquatic environment  (acute) category 2 and 3 Not dangerous goods
Hazardous to aquatic environment  (chronic) category 1 and 2 Class 9 miscellaneous dangerous goods: marine pollutant or environmentally hazardous substances, packing group III
Hazardous  to aquatic environment (chronic) category 3 and 4 Not dangerous goods
Hazardous to the Ozone layer Not dangerous goods

Note 1: Most of health hazards in GHS are not covered by dangerous goods regulations. Class 6 division 6.2 infectious substances and class 4 radioactive substances in TDG are not covered by GHS. 

Note 2: The correlations between GHS hazard classes and dangerous goods classes above are general cases. There are exceptions. 

Comparison of Dangerous Goods Label and GHS Label

Item TDG GHS
Basic info
Label size There are requirements on the minimum dimension of hazard labels. (i.e, 100mm x100mm for >25kg packages.) Various requirements (See global GHS label size requirement).
Exceptions Dangerous goods packaged in limited quantities or excepted quantities do not require hazard labels.  Some GHS elements may be omitted from GHS label for small containers
Example Dangerous goods label GHS label

A chemical product may be packaged in multi-layer packages in which case inner packages need to be labelled according to GHS while the outer packaging shall meet the provisions of TDG. Outer packages may also be labelled according to GHS (This is mandatory for single packagings such as drum). Where the GHS hazard pictogram(s) relate to the same hazard as dangerous goods hazard label, the GHS pictogram(s) need not appear on the outer packaging.

Correlations between TDG and GHS

More readings

 

 Tags: Topics - TDGDangerous Goods

Sponsored Content

Related Topics